Having Fun With Simulation Games

Simulation games are the games that focus on the real life. They are the games related to the real world like a flight games, fashion designing games, racing, architecture, shooting, etc. The games, in a way, teach the players how to deal with realism and also forces the players to understand and remember the complex principles and relations involved with the game subject matter. Yet they remain very exciting and entertaining.

Therefore, if someone has not been able to experience the actual activity, for example flying a fighter plane in real life, then with the help of the simulation games, you can do so. It helps you gain the experience in what you wanted to do but could not do in your life. These days many profession institutions are teaching the students with the help of the simulation games. For example, the dental institutes are virtual dental games to teach the students how to operate on a tooth and pilots are receiving training with the help of Flight Pro Sim. With simulation games as educators, mistakes that could be life-threatening are only a virtual happening. These games are getting more popular now and even more and more new games are coming up with some different real life experiences.

The simulation games are the video or computer games that are played developing skills required using realistic situations. Example: these games include taking care of a virtual person, developing the cities or societies, building amusement parks. In other words with the help of these games one can see the model or a sample before giving it the final shape. Therefore many educational organisations are using the simulation games for the training purposes as there is no risk to the lives of the young trainees during the training sessions and also every little detail can be taught with ease without causing any damage to the machinery, or any other material used in the training processes.

Computer Hardware and Simulation Gaming for Aviation Safety Considered

Modern day computer hardware is getting quite robust, and there is about 10 times the computing power in a smart phone as was used to fly the first Space Shuttle, maybe more. Still, when it comes to operating today’s aircraft simulators the computer hardware is intense, and these simulators can cost a ton of money. Because they cost so much the time to use them becomes very valuable, therefore most airlines only use them as required to check out their pilots, or train them for certification on the next aircraft that pilot needs to fly so he or she can get their type rating and satisfactorily prove they are safe.

The other day, I was speaking with an expert in computer online gaming communities, Troy Laclaire, about the use of simulators in aviation, and how great these tools were for complying with safety standards and preventing mistakes in the real world, carrying real passengers, when it really mattered most. One question we pondered was should airline pilots, commercial pilots, charter pilots, and fractional jet pilots be required to fly with another pilot to an airport first prior to going there as the pilot in command for the first time.

If such an onerous rule were to be made by the FAA, what about simulators, couldn’t a pilot merely fly the last 5-10 minutes on approach and take-off to each airport that the airline generally went too? Maybe, but in the case of a charter jet, that might mean they’d spend 100s of hours in a simulator and that costs a lot of money right? Okay so is there a solution to all this? Troy has come up with one potential solution, so lets’ talk about this shall we. First, Troy notes:

The only problem with this is that simulators are not exactly cheap to run and each simulation takes a fair amount of time, and far as I understand simulators are mostly used to get pilots comfortable with flying a particular plane type. However, since the pilots are generally already familiar with flying their planes (at least I should hope so) and nearly everyone has computers these days, it is possible that you could have a DVD series created to cover the routes, based around actual flights, and then have the pilots use their computers to run these so that they can get some familiarity with the airports.

Now then, this is a good idea, and it makes sense, a perfect solution, plus it also stands to reason that a gaming expert would come up with this concept. Okay so, Troy also suggests that we “provide the pilots with a take home DVD, basic flight-sim gaming controls, and they can use these to get some muscle memory.” This too makes sense, keeping it simple, and perfect for a last-minute booking for a fractional jet, or charter flight, as the pilot can merely practice a couple of ILS approaches, missed approach, take-off, and navigating the taxi ways, etc.

Troy, being a computer hardware engineer, and quite the prudent safety advisor also states; “Alternatively, have a “pilots room” setup where a pilot can run through a video/basic simulator of a previous flight that has already flown that route, letting them get a rough idea of what to expect when going to an airport they are not yet familiar with.”

Okay so that’s pretty easy, it can be set up in the break room of the local Jet Center, or at an FBO etc. Perhaps, for $10-20 they can shoot a couple of landings at the desired future airport that they will be flying too? Perhaps, it might also be available to ALL general aviation pilots, the DVDs and a flight simulator room at the local FBO, etc. May as well keep the system busy and paying for itself, perhaps it might also spit out certificates of completion and aviation insurance companies may consider lowering rates too? Indeed, I hope you will consider all this and think on it.

Top Ten PC Games In The World

What elements push a game beyond mere goodness and into greatness? To this author, PC games are best when they deliver a transcendent gaming experience that is possible only with the aid of a personal computer: They don’t simulate board or card games, reproduce real-world sports, or try to approximate movies. They are an art form unto themselves. To be considered, a game must have achieved most of its prominence on a PC platform. (This explains why Tetris, for example, didn’t make the cut: It was clearly the Nintendo Game Boy’s killer app). I defined a “PC” as any consumer computer that has a keyboard the user can program with arbitrary code–not just a PC of the IBM variety. If you’re into PC games, check out “15 Reasons PC Gaming Beats All,” too. And if you want to stay current with the latest games, tune into PC World’s ace gaming blog, Game On! Without further ado, here is the Top Tens List for the Greatest PC Games in the world…

#10: Homefront

The 10th ranking game in our top tens list, Homefront, is a first-person shooter video game developed by now defunct “Kaos Studios” and published by THQ, in which players play as members of a resistance movement fighting against a near-future Korean military occupation of the United States.

Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PS 3 Genre: First-person shooter Mode(s): Single-player, Multi-player Ratings: BBFC = 15, ESRB = M

#9: Fable III

At number 9 in our top tens list is, Fable III, the Third video game in Fable series of ‘action role-playing games (RPG) developed by Liohead Studios and published by Microsoft Game Studios for Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360. It focuses on the player’s struggle to overthrow the King of Alboin by forming alliances and building support for revolution.

Series: Fable Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360 Genre: Action RPG, sandbox, file simulation Mode(s): Single-player, Cooperative Ratings: ACB = MA15+, BBFC = 12+, ESRB = M, PEGI = 16+

#8: F.E.A.R. 3

The 8th ranking game in our top tens list is F.E.A.R. 3, a first person-shooter developed by Dan 1 Studios for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and the OnLive cloud gaming service as a sequel to the game F.E.A.R: Project Origin and the third installment of the F.E.A.R series. It includes features such as “co-op, an evolved cover system, and more scares”. In the game, the players control either Point Man or Paxton Fettel, the protagonist and antagonist, from the first game, F.E.A.R. and the control system is the same as the previous two games.

Series: F.E.A.R Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PS 3 Genre: First-person shooter, horror Mode(s): Single-player, Multi-player Ratings: ACB = MA15+, BBFC = 18, ESRB = M, PEGI = 18

#7: Dragon Age II

Ranking at number 7 in our top tens list is Dragon Age II, a role playing video game developed by Bioware’s Edmonton Studios, and published by Electronic Arts. It is the second major game in BioWare’s “Dragon Age” franchise. It is set in the same mythical world introduced in Dragon Age: Origins, the player assumes the role of Hawke, a human mage, warrior, or rogue who arrives in the city of Kirkwall as a lowly refugee but becomes its legendary champion over a turbulent decade of political and social conflict.

Series: Dragon Age Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PS 3, Mac OS X Genre: Role-playing Mode(s): Single-player Ratings: ESRB = M, PEGI = 18

#6: Dead Space 2

The 6th ranking game in our top tens list is Dead Space 2, a survival horror third-person shooter video game developed by Visceral Games and published by Electronic Arts. It is the sequel to “Dead Space”. Unlike its predecessor, Dead Space 2 has a multi-player mode.

Series: Dead Space Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PS 3 Genre: Third-person shooter, Survival horror Mode(s): Single-player, Multi-player Ratings: ACB = MA15+, BBFC = 18, ESRB = M, PEGI = 18

#5: Terraria

Ranking 5th in our top tens list is Terraria, an action-adventure/RPG indie game released by independent game studio “Re-Logic”. The game features exploration, crafting, building structures and combat with a variety of creatures. The game’s slogan is “Shut Up and Dig Gaiden”.

Platforms: Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 Genre: Indie side scroller action adventure/RPG Mode(s): Single-player, Multi-player Ratings: ESRB = E10+, PEGI = 12

#4: Portal 2

The 4th ranking game in our top tens list is Portal 2, a first-person puzzle-platform video game developed and published by Valve Corporation. It is the sequel to the 2007 video game ‘Portal’. Like Portal, Portal 2 primarily comprises a series of puzzle that must be solved by teleporting the player’s character and simple objects using the “portal gun”, a device that can create inter-spatial portals between two flat panes. The game’s unique physics allow momentum to be retained through these portals and requires the creative use of portals to maneuver through the game’s challenges.

Series: Portal Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PS 3, Mac OS X Genre: Puzzle-platform game Mode(s): Single-player, Co-operative Ratings: ESRB = E10+, PEGI = 12

#3: The Sims 3

The 3rd ranking game in our top tens list is The Sims 3, a strategic life simulation computer game developed by The Sims Studio and published by Electronic Arts. It is the sequel to the best-selling computer game, ‘The Sims 2’.

Series: The Sims Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, iOS, webOS, Android, Symbian^3, Nintendo DS, Nintendo 3DS, Wii, N-Gage, Xbox 360, PS 3 Genre: Life Simulation, Social simulation Mode(s): Single-player Ratings: ACB = M, ESRB = T, PEGI = 12

#2: Counter Strike Source

Counter Strike Source ranks 2nd in our top tens list. It is a first-person shooting video game developed by Valve Corporation. It is a complete remake of “Counter-Strike” using the “Source” game engine. As in the original, Counter Strike: Source pits a team of counter-terrorists against a team of terrorists in a series of rounds. Each round is won either by completing an objective (such as detonating a bomb or rescuing hostages) or by eliminating all members of the opposing team.

Series: Counter Strike Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X Genre: First-person shooter Mode(s): Multi-player Ratings: ESRB = M, PEGI = 16+

#1: Assassin’s Creed: Brother Hood

Finally…the best of our top tens list of video games is Assassin’s Creed: Brother Hood; a historical third-person, stealth action-adventure video game developed by Ubisoft. It is the third major installment in the Assassin’s Creed series and the second chapter in the ‘Ezio Trilogy’. The game is a direct sequel to Assassin’s Creed II, with Ezio Auditore da Firenze and Desmond Miles returning as the main protagonists.

Series: Assassin’s Creed Platforms: Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, PS 3, Mac OS X Genre: Third-person action-adventure, Sandbox Mode(s): Single-player, Multi-player Ratings: ACB = MA15+, BBFC = 15, ESRB = M, PEGI = 18